ARMENIAN POLITICAL SCIENTIST: IN ARMENIAN-GEORGIAN RELATIONS THERE IS DIRECT EVIDENCE OF COLLUSION WITH THIRD PARTY
.
.
Yerevan, October 17
ArmInfo

Today, at a press-conference at the National press-club, Igor Mouradyan, a famous Armenian political scientist, said that in the Armenian-Georgian relations there is direct evidence of collusion, probably, with a third party He noted that from 1997 till 2003 he actively took up the problems of the Georgian region Samtskhe-Javakheti, participating in three EU expert programs. Besides, he has lately returned from Samtskhe-Javakheti, therefore he knows the situation in the region from within. According to him, there was a period when public organizations were actively established in the region and were controlled by Armenia. They gave diverse information, but because of the lack of bright leaders they gradually lost their topicality. At the moment these are just offices with few people. Another thing is the recently established which unifies about 20 organizations. Its main body consists of 2-3 thousand of politically competent young men, mostly from the Youth Center. They have 15-20 representatives in each village of the region. Igor Mouradyan is convinced that the received no more than 70% of votes at the recent municipal elections of Georgia, however Tbilisi could not afford the defeat of the ruling party, that's why only 5 representatives remained in the organization in the rural administrations. In this connection, Mouradyan noted that the West considers Samtskhe-Javakheti a kind of , allowing the Georgian authorities to do anything they like, as the international community is very interested in the region and considers that the USA-Turkey relations depend on this region. It resulted in the acknowledgement, though with minor reservations, of the recent regional municipal elections corresponding to the European standards by the OSCE mission of observers. Mouradyan said that the international community considers Georgia not capable to maintain the security in the region, therefore some international contingent will certainly be present in Georgia. However, he emphasized that the recent Georgian-Russian crisis postponed Georgia's joining the NATO for several years at least. As regards the Armenian-Georgian relations, Armenia is evidently carrying out some obligation, most likely, to the West, in Mouradyan's opinion. This may explain Armenia's non-intervention into the Javakhk problem, and the recent arrest of Vahagn Chakhalyan, a activist. Mouradyan said that there are not and cannot be any documents about such collusion, but this is the most logic explanation of official Yerevan's actions. He thinks that, probably, at the price of such policy of Armenia, the international community will acknowledge the forthcoming parliamentary elections in Armenia.